consultations, news

Bruce Grove Consultation – urgent action needed!

Transport for London are currently consulting on changes to the A10 at Bruce Grove (from the rail station south to Forster Road). The consultation is open until 7 December, please have your say via https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/bruce-grove/

These proposals were discussed at Haringey Cycling Campaign’s monthly meeting on the 14 November. Unfortunately, we found very little to recommend from a cycling perspective. The junction treatment outside Bruce Grove station is likely to benefit pedestrians and to a lesser extent those on bikes. However, in our view the remainder of the proposed work would decrease safety for people cycling, and as such we are requesting TfL go back to the drawing board and come back with something much better. Our reasoning is set out below – you may wish to raise these points in your response. Remember the consultation closes on 7 December!

The proposals include a dangerous and unnecessary pinch point
The new signalised pedestrian crossing proposes to narrow the existing carriageway width to 3m in each direction. We object to this creation of a pinch point, which seems unnecessary for pedestrian safety as the proposed crossing is signalised. We are concerned that the proposed narrowing will increase conflict between road users – in theory cycles should “take the lane” to prevent dangerous overtaking but this would only be a sensible approach on a road with light volumes of traffic travelling at low speeds. For what we think are obvious reasons, this approach is not applicable to this situation.

Proposals remove existing cycle provision
There is an existing cycle route (LCN 54) that crosses the High Rd at St Loys Rd. In 2003 and 2006 detailed proposals were made, but not implemented, to upgrade this crossing. There are presently cycle reservations to the north and south of the junction, which are at least some assistance in crossing the High Road. The present proposals include the removal of the south reservation and this is not an acceptable alteration as no replacement provision is shown.

Current proposals are incompatible with increasing cycle numbers
A 2007 Transport for London scheme for the A10 from Monument Way to St Loys Rd, consulted on but not implemented, included cycle lanes. There remains ample road space for comprehensive cycle provision. Indeed, as part of implementing Mini Holland, Enfield are currently consulting on a proposal for protected cycle tracks on the A1010 up to the Haringey border. Cycle Superhighway 1 does not provide a suitable alternative route, particularly with the decision not to filter through traffic on Broadwater Road. The A10 at Bruce Grove is and will remain heavily used by cycles: Planning policy for Tottenham regeneration seeks to reduce private car use and improving cycle provision in Enfield and Waltham Forest means that the ambition for the A10 should be as a main cycle route.

We therefore urge that these proposals are either redesigned or not taken forward as part of this scheme.

consultations, news

CS1 response

Last chance to have your say on Haringey’s Cycle Superhighway

Here’s our proposed response to Transport for London’s Cycle Superhighway route 1 (CS1) consultation which ends on Sunday.

The response below is a draft on behalf of Haringey Cycling Campaign and London Cycling Campaign  – there may be minor edits after the London Cycling Campaign IRG (Infrastructure Review Group) meeting on Thursday 26th March.

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Proposed 2-way cycle track on the western pavement of the High Road between West Green Road and Town Hall Approach, lanes separated by trees (which already exist)

 

We feel there are many problems with the present proposals.

TfL are already reconsidering the South section of the route through Haringey, following our objections to the St Ann’s Road alignment.

Hopefully there will also be a rethink on the centre section from South Tottenham station, past Seven Sisters Road to Philip Lane, which includes sections of shared space on the pavement outside a busy Seven Sisters underground station entrance and High Road bus stop – where local cyclists have recently been stopped from cycling by MPS Haringey (although the acting Inspector has since apologised by email and sent a memo to all neighbourhood team reminding officers what a shared use space sign looks like).

Please let TfL know your views! The deadline for responses is Sunday the 29th March.

CS1 consultation event in Marcus Garvey library
CS1 consultation event in Marcus Garvey library

 

The TfL consultation documents can be found at  https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/cycling/cs1

 

Our full draft response can be read here – with section by section notes: CS1 notes LCC.HCC

Our thoughts and sketch for a protected right turn at Philip Lane in to Town Hall Approach can be found here: Philip Lane Protected Right

A very well written response to the proposals by Tottenham Civic Society can be read here: Tottenham Civic Society – CS1

Here's how busy the current shared space is - even busier when students are arriving and leaving College of North East London. The large tree planter CANNOT be removed or reduced so all pedestrians and cyclists using CS1's proposed route will be funnelled to the right of this tree, where everyone is walking.
Here’s how busy the current shared space is – even busier when students are arriving and leaving College of North East London. The large tree planter CANNOT be removed or reduced so all pedestrians and cyclists using CS1’s proposed route will be funnelled to the right of this tree, where everyone is walking.
news

Our response to London Cycling Design Standards consultation

Cycling image

TfL say :

‘Last published in 2005, the revised London Cycling Design Standards (LCDS) is a technical document that should inform design options and promote an integrated and ambitious approach to delivering high quality infrastructure for cycling in all parts of London.

It has now been comprehensively updated to reflect established and emerging best practice, and to help planners and designers meet the aspirations of the Mayor’s Vision for Cycling.’

Well it is a VERY hefty document – but we took time to look through it all, and Haringey Cycling Campaign responded to the London Cycling Design Standards consultation with a number of suggestions and comments. Michael Poteliakhoff, our Coordinator  put together a response with the following highlights:

  • LCDS must be mandatory for ALL NEW WORK.  Perhaps this is not the intention, but there must be NO AMBIGUITY on this.
  • It should be made clear stakeholders need to be consulted on detailed design, including carriageway widths.  On major schemes, consultation should be required at both concept and detail design stages.
  • At all new road layouts, lead-in lanes to ASL’s should be mandatory, or the nearside traffic lane should be at least 4.5m, to allow cycle access. An ASL that cannot be accessed is either pointless or can encourage dangerous squeezing through narrow gaps.
  • Sinusoidal ramps are mentioned here and in Chapter 4, however no section drawing is given. The drawings included in the 2005 LCDS are very helpful for stakeholders, to understand the concept and to allow discussion with engineers who do not always know how to get them right.  Drawings for this and other construction details should be added, also perhaps a mention of the use of profile boards, which are a help for quality control.
  •  Excellent to see “Cyclists Dismount” signs are not to be used, though possibly there should be a qualification to allow them when a cycle route approaches steps.
  •  Granite setts-  Use should always be avoided where straight (as opposed to staggered) jointing and/or degradation from traffic can result in a wheel trap for narrow tyres.

We look forward to seeing the LCDS advice being put in to place in Haringey, and will endeavour to put pressure on Haringey Council to do so.