consultations, news

CS1 response

Last chance to have your say on Haringey’s Cycle Superhighway

Here’s our proposed response to Transport for London’s Cycle Superhighway route 1 (CS1) consultation which ends on Sunday.

The response below is a draft on behalf of Haringey Cycling Campaign and London Cycling Campaign  – there may be minor edits after the London Cycling Campaign IRG (Infrastructure Review Group) meeting on Thursday 26th March.

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Proposed 2-way cycle track on the western pavement of the High Road between West Green Road and Town Hall Approach, lanes separated by trees (which already exist)

 

We feel there are many problems with the present proposals.

TfL are already reconsidering the South section of the route through Haringey, following our objections to the St Ann’s Road alignment.

Hopefully there will also be a rethink on the centre section from South Tottenham station, past Seven Sisters Road to Philip Lane, which includes sections of shared space on the pavement outside a busy Seven Sisters underground station entrance and High Road bus stop – where local cyclists have recently been stopped from cycling by MPS Haringey (although the acting Inspector has since apologised by email and sent a memo to all neighbourhood team reminding officers what a shared use space sign looks like).

Please let TfL know your views! The deadline for responses is Sunday the 29th March.

CS1 consultation event in Marcus Garvey library
CS1 consultation event in Marcus Garvey library

 

The TfL consultation documents can be found at  https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/cycling/cs1

 

Our full draft response can be read here – with section by section notes: CS1 notes LCC.HCC

Our thoughts and sketch for a protected right turn at Philip Lane in to Town Hall Approach can be found here: Philip Lane Protected Right

A very well written response to the proposals by Tottenham Civic Society can be read here: Tottenham Civic Society – CS1

Here's how busy the current shared space is - even busier when students are arriving and leaving College of North East London. The large tree planter CANNOT be removed or reduced so all pedestrians and cyclists using CS1's proposed route will be funnelled to the right of this tree, where everyone is walking.
Here’s how busy the current shared space is – even busier when students are arriving and leaving College of North East London. The large tree planter CANNOT be removed or reduced so all pedestrians and cyclists using CS1’s proposed route will be funnelled to the right of this tree, where everyone is walking.
consultations, news

Cycle Superhighway 1 – our letter to Haringey Council

B9_HmjJCMAIhkw3UPDATE: Keep a look out for how to respond to the CS1 consultation – WE WILL NEED YOUR SUPPORT.

Here’s the proposed  two-way cycle track on the pavement on the High Road north of Seven Sisters.

What to know what we think of the latest plans? Here’s our letter to Haringey Council regarding the proposed alignment of Cycle Superhighway 1:

Dear Malcolm,

1st February 2015

TfL have recently issued revised drawings for CS1.  The trees which encroached on the cycle path near Seven Sisters Underground have been relocated and parking which obstructed access to the contra flow near Lordship Lane has been removed, however it seems no other comments from LCC/ HCC have been addressed and apart from these points the drawings appear identical to those issued before.   The new drawings have been reviewed by the LCC Infrastructure Review Group (IRG) and it was agreed points as below would be raised in the forthcoming TfL Design Review Group.  We will keep you informed of any comments from LCC.
CS1, Haringey
As stated previously the alignment does not make sense. If this alignment is used there are a number of issues to address:-
1) Modal filter needed at Frinton Rd
2) Frinton to St Ann’s Rd is a right turn onto a hugely busy road – must be signalised and segregated
3) In the High Rd at the rail bridge, the reduced 2.5m pavement width on the east side of the toucan is not suitable. The toucan should be moved closer to the Crowland Rd Junction.
4) The “stepping stone” markings proposed look confusing, with no clarity for pedestrian or cycle priority. Not appropriate for a cycle superhighway to go through a shared use area – it is a busy area and there will be conflict.
5) High Rd/Seven Sisters Rd needs to be a cycle segregated T Junction, with one phase, not toucans.
6) Cycle friendly signal control needed at West Green Rd junction as LCDS Fig 4.9 options 1 and 2 to allow movements, as shown in HCC drawing.
7) Proximity of Underground exits serious risk of conflict – pedestrians both sides. Peds will need a crossing point to get into the Underground and clear signage.
8) Outside College of North East London: raised tree planter is used as informal seating by students. Major risk of conflict and lack of continuity. Need to reconfigure tree pit or purchase land from College.
9) Where the roads split and CS1 goes up Town Hall Approach Rd: this is a very busy narrow section of one way road: when buses are stopped here cyclists won’t be able to pass. Need to let cyclists onto the paved area to overtake buses, to feed in to re-configured straight across toucan to join to local E/W cycle route.
10) Need to provide hatched centre line marking at TH Approach all traffic 2-way section, to ensure awareness of oncoming traffic.
11) Junction of Town Hall Approach Rd and Philip Lane is a busy junction. Philip Lane needs proper segregation – junction should be cycle segregated leading into protected tracks. Armadillos or wands may work here – stepped tracks wouldn’t be acceptable if there is a risk that they would be parked on. All of Philip Lane (pages 13, 14, 15) needs segregation.
12) Strode Rd into Sperling Rd – only about 3m wide – entirely unsuitable to share with pedestrians
13) At Lordship Lane bus stop conflicts with S bound cycle 2-stage turn. Move bus stop to other side of Broadwater Rd junction. Cyclists turning right into a major road will require control (lights).
14) Lordship Lane needs two toucans synchronised to get cyclists across. This would eradicate need for traffic islands with cycle bollards, allowing room for segregated tracks.
HCC lobbied strongly for CS1 to avoid St Ann’s Rd, but now that it is definitely following this alignment, it needs to be made as cycle friendly as possible.  Another major concern to HCC, is the design of the junctions in the area of Seven Sisters Station and the related pedestrian areas.  It seems TfL aim to thread CS1 through this area with a minimum of change to the recently completed work, which in spite of repeated reminders to the design team, took no account of the planned CS1.  This simply will not work.  There have been numerous complaints on the dangers of the present layout, for example going straight ahead from West Green Rd to Broad Lane, across other traffic flows.  If CS1 is “bolted on” to this already unsatisfactory situation, a need for many more dangerous manoeuvres will be added.  For example how will cycles access CS1 from Broad Lane?  Are they meant to filter through waiting pedestrians at the unsegregated Toucan Crossings?  This might be acceptable for a low volume cycle route, but for a superhighway and the high pedestrian traffic in this location, it isn’t.
We can find no precedent for the “stepping stone” shared use markings proposed by TfL and think they will cause confusion.  There are precedents for clearly marked cycle paths in pedestrian areas, for example in Seville where studs are used in conjunction with pedestrian priority signs (where appropriate).  The photograph below shows a cycle route at a tramline crossing (see also
http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/jan/28/seville-cycling-capital-southern-europe-bike-lanesfor a general review of cycle provision in Seville).  There is also guidance on cycle route shared use marking and junction design in the new London Cycle Design Standards.  TfL are presently building or upgrading a number of Cycle Superhighways following these Standards and it would be a real missed opportunity if the only Superhighway planned for Haringey is not compliant.  I would be grateful if you could take this up with TfL.
Regards,   Michael Poteliakhoff
Coordinator, Haringey Cycling Campaign
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The consultation on Cycle Superhighway 1 was due to launch in late 2014, but consultation is now due in February 2015, and CS1 is due for completion in April 2016.

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TfL’s current proposals can be seen in TfL Board papers at https://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/documents/board-20150204-part-1-item-07a-propose-csh-scheme.pdf  (pages 50-55).

London Cycling Campaign and Haringey Cycling Campaign have objected to the proposed alignment in Haringey, in particular the narrow and very busy section along St Ann’s Rd, but we are now concentrating on whatever alignment goes ahead being built to the best possible standard.

It looks as if it’s going to be more of a “Superquietway” than a proper CS.  Our full consultation response comments will be made when the details go public – make sure you give TfL your feedback!

 

news

Suggest a Bikehangar location in Haringey

We’re receiving a lot of requests via Twitter and email, asking how to request secure cycle parking in your road, so thought we better create a ‘How to’ guide!

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Grand opening of the Warwick Gardens Bikehangar – the first in Haringey. There was a waiting list for spaces within a week.

What is a ‘bikehangar’?

Good question. They’re actually called ‘The Lambeth Bikehangar’ but don’t let that put you off – they can live in Haringey too, and some already do!

More info via Cyclehoop, who supply and install the units:  Bikehangar is an award-winning popular design for outdoor sites offering a safe and effective way to protect bikes from tough weather conditions and vandalism where storage space is limited. The gas assisted door makes accessing your bike simple, reducing effort when opening the hangar. Furthermore, the galvanized steel frame acts to protect your bike from the elements as well as theft.

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It is an effective street de-cluttering design which can store up to six bicycles and only occupies half a parking space. The Lambeth Bikehangar is very popular with councils, who can purchase it and rent out cycle parking spaces to local residents. If you are a resident interested in renting a space in a Lambeth Bikehangar, please search for the one closest to you or request one to be installed on your road here.

Find out more on the Cyclehoop website. 

Where are they in Haringey?

As of November 2014, there are now 4 Bikehangars installed in the borough of Haringey.

1. Warwick Gardens – run by the Gardens Residents Association – installed July 2014. Visited in our first ride around the centre of the borough with local councillors

2. Roslyn Road, N15

3. Stanhope Road, N15

4. Stapleton Hall Road, N4

Here’s the Traffic Management Order (?) TMO for installation of the 3 latest Bikehangars.

Bikehangar parking notice

How do I request one for where I live?

The more requests for a Bikehangar in a specific location, the more likely it will happen, so knock on your neighbours’ doors and get them involved! Full details are available on Haringey Council’s website, which has some helpful tips to make sure your application has the best chance of success, but do also make sure you do the following:

  1. Send an email to cycle.parking@haringey.gov.uk Copy us in: haringey@lcc.org.uk  AND your local ward councillors for Haringey. Click here to find out their email addresses
  2. You might want to check if your local councillors supports Space for Cycling in their ward first
  3. You could also suggest a location, by filling in the form on the Cyclehoop website. Cyclehoop will give a report to Haringey Council and a map of the requested locations.

Bikehangars in the wild….

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Here’s a fine example of a modal filter and Bikehangar just over the border in Hackney on Finsbury Park Road.

Want to request a location for a sheffield stand? Email cycle.parking@haringey.gov.uk (expect an autoreply). Try to include a photo or Streetview link of where you would like the stand, and state why you think one (or more) should be installed. 

Want more advice? Tweet @haringeycyclist or email Haringey@lcc.org.uk

 

consultations, news

Our response to TfL’s Archway consultation

Thank you to all London Cycling Campaign members and supporters in Haringey and Islington who spared a minute to respond to Transport for London’s proposals for the removal of the Archway Gyratory system.
Click here  to review Islington Cyclists Action Group’s full response on their website.
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As well as many individual responses, Haringey Cycling Campaign responded to the proposals too. Here’s what we said:
Haringey Cycling Campaign welcomes the proposals, however the cycle routes through the junction are incomplete, with dangerous manoeuvres through general traffic still needed.  Continuous segregated cycle tracks and protected junctions are needed throughout.   We fully support the detailed comments of Islington Cyclists Action Group which can be summarised as-
1) Coming from Junction Road to St Johns Way there is a left hook risk: requiring cyclists to turn right across left turning traffic. A cycle track along the central Archway island and a cycle crossing on ArchwayRoad would ensure these cyclists are safe.
2) It is not clear how to get from Archway station into Holloway Road. We need a segregated track, clearly distinguishing bikes and pedestrians, linking the track down Highgate Hill in front of the station to the southbound Holloway Road track.
3) It is impossible to cross Archway Road north of Tollhouse Way. We need a link from Archway Road (northbound) to Archway Road/Harberton Road, particularly at Despard Road and Waterlow Road.
4) Macdonald Road and Vorley Road should be two way for cycling
Incomplete cycle provision can give a false sense of security and lead to increased risk, as at the Cycle Superhighway junctions now being upgraded and we trust these points can be addressed.
The scheme should avoid using guardrailing (none is shown), but there should be features such as kerbs, planting, bollards or seating to indicate the extent of pedestrian areas. The cycle lanes should have 45deg angle kerbs. Cycle parking can also be used to emphasise the edge of a pedestrian area, as used very successfully at Kingsland High St.
news

Help us fight for Space for Cycling in Haringey

After the May 2014 elections, 24 of the 57 elected councillors (42%) pledged to support Space for Cycling in Haringey. We need your help to ensure that they keep their promises CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT SPACE FOR CYCLING IN HARINGEY

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To see whether your councillors support Space for Cycling, please click here to see the campaign map.

consultations, news

Our view of proposed 20mph limit across the ‘whole’ of the borough

Read more about the 20mph in Haringey consultation, and have your say via the Haringey Council website here. 

We feel that there a number of roads which are currently intended to be exempt, and will remain at 30mph.

Here’s our letter to Haringey’s Cabinet Member for the Environment, Cllr Stuart McNamara.

Image thanks to Bounds Green Residents Association.

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Dear Cllr McNamara,

HCC fully supports the planned implementation a 20mph default speed limit on all borough roads in Haringey, apart from certain main roads, however it seems to us some of the roads intended to be designated at 30mph, should have a 20mph limit, to take account of local conditions and to maximise pedestrian and cycle safety.  The roads we would ask to be reconsidered are-

 

Fortis Green Rd, which has a number of shops and restaurants and also a very narrow section, where a 20mph limit will greatly improve road safety.

 

Hornsey High Street, where there are many shops and restaurants and at least 3 schools in the vicinity.

 

West Green Road, where there are many schools, shops and restaurants and where heavy traffic congestion during the day means that the average traffic speed must be already below 20mph.  An official 20mph limit will smooth the traffic flow and improve safety.

 

The whole of the Tottenham Lane/ Church Lane one way system, which is next to a school in one direction and leads up to shops in the other and where speeding traffic can be very intimidating in a mainly residential area.

 

Cycling Champion Cllr Toni Mallett has said she considers Hornsey High Street and West Green Rd should in particular be made 20mph and I hope all the roads above can be looked at again, in consultation with local councillors.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Michael Poteliakhoff

Coordinator HCC

news

Notes from East of borough ride with Councillors & Officers

Following our successful September ride around the central third of the borough (well, Wood Green, Turnpike Lane, Harringay) with Cllr Toni Mallet (the borough cycling champion) and Cllr Stuart Macnamara (our Cabinet Member for the Environment) we held our second ride, heading east on 17th October.

We were joined by 2 Project Engineers who work in the Sustainable Transport team at Haringey Council – the engineers and Cllr Macnamara borrowing council pool bikes – although Stuart has now officially sign up to keep his pool bike long term!

To get an idea of where we covered, here’s a rough ride route:

Chestnuts Park, North Grove, Roslyn Road, Town Hall Approach, Broad Lane, Ashley Road, Park View Road barriers, Watermead Way, Northumberland park, Park Lane, Bruce Castle Park, Risley Avenue.

We visited a number of sites we identified as Haringey Space for Cycling ward asks – including the infamous Park View Road barrier. 

Here’s the notes from the ride, which we’ve presented to all present for reference. 

 

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news

Our response to London Cycling Design Standards consultation

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TfL say :

‘Last published in 2005, the revised London Cycling Design Standards (LCDS) is a technical document that should inform design options and promote an integrated and ambitious approach to delivering high quality infrastructure for cycling in all parts of London.

It has now been comprehensively updated to reflect established and emerging best practice, and to help planners and designers meet the aspirations of the Mayor’s Vision for Cycling.’

Well it is a VERY hefty document – but we took time to look through it all, and Haringey Cycling Campaign responded to the London Cycling Design Standards consultation with a number of suggestions and comments. Michael Poteliakhoff, our Coordinator  put together a response with the following highlights:

  • LCDS must be mandatory for ALL NEW WORK.  Perhaps this is not the intention, but there must be NO AMBIGUITY on this.
  • It should be made clear stakeholders need to be consulted on detailed design, including carriageway widths.  On major schemes, consultation should be required at both concept and detail design stages.
  • At all new road layouts, lead-in lanes to ASL’s should be mandatory, or the nearside traffic lane should be at least 4.5m, to allow cycle access. An ASL that cannot be accessed is either pointless or can encourage dangerous squeezing through narrow gaps.
  • Sinusoidal ramps are mentioned here and in Chapter 4, however no section drawing is given. The drawings included in the 2005 LCDS are very helpful for stakeholders, to understand the concept and to allow discussion with engineers who do not always know how to get them right.  Drawings for this and other construction details should be added, also perhaps a mention of the use of profile boards, which are a help for quality control.
  •  Excellent to see “Cyclists Dismount” signs are not to be used, though possibly there should be a qualification to allow them when a cycle route approaches steps.
  •  Granite setts-  Use should always be avoided where straight (as opposed to staggered) jointing and/or degradation from traffic can result in a wheel trap for narrow tyres.

We look forward to seeing the LCDS advice being put in to place in Haringey, and will endeavour to put pressure on Haringey Council to do so.

Uncategorized

‘Top 10’ improvements for Haringey becomes ‘Top 29’

We meet with Haringey Council at least every 3 months.

We keep an ongoing ‘Top 10’ list of improvements we’d like to see made in the borough. In reality, of course, the list is much longer. In fact, in light of our part in our recent ‘space for cycling’ campaign in Haringey, we now have a Top 29. 

Read more here

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St Ann’s Road/Hermitage Road new cycle entry on to roundabout which we campaigned for.
events

Feeder ride from Haringey to the BIG RIDE 2014

Haringey feeder ride

Join our experienced Ride Leader Patrick, on a guided and marshalled ride to the London Cycling Campaign Space for Cycling Big Ride 2014. The ride

Meet 9.15am on Saturday 17th May at Ducketts Common (across the road from Turnpike Lane tube station). We’ll be leaving at 9.30am on the dot, and meeting Islington Cyclists feeder ride at Highbury Fields, before heading down to Park Lane as one big ride!

The return ride to Haringey will meet at Temple after the ride has finished (around 2pm)

support s4c

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