School street in operation in Haringey
news

School Streets 2021

Haringey has introduced two School Streets and more are planned for the summer term. Haringey Cycling Campaign welcomes this move and has written to the council saying so – and suggesting some improvements.

A School Street is a timed street closure during drop-off and pick-up times outside a school. Usually these last for 1-1.5 hours at the start and end of the school day, tailored to each school’s start and finish times. The School Streets will operate Monday-Friday during term times.

Only people walking and cycling, and those with vehicle exemption permits are eligible to enter the zone. Anyone else driving into the zone during the stated times will receive a fine. You do not need to have an exemption permit to exit from the School Street.

There are two ways that Haringey is operating the School Streets:

Volunteer-led School Streets

Some School Streets will be operated by volunteers who are members of the school community. They will extend a barrier across the street while the School Street is in operation and marshal the barrier to allow permitted vehicles into and out of the street.

To support the volunteers, enforcement officers sometimes help to monitor compliance.

Camera Enforced School Streets

These School Streets will not physically block access to motor vehicles, instead they will be monitored using Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras (ANPR). These cameras monitor the number plates of the vehicles that drive into the street and administer fines if the vehicle is not registered for a permit. The penalty charge issued for driving into a School Street is £130, reduced to £65 if paid within 14 days.

Existing School Streets

School Streets being introduced in the summer term 2021

Haringey Cycling Campaign has written the following letter to the council welcoming the new school streets and suggesting some improvements:

HCC warmly welcomes the eleven school streets schemes due to be implemented this summer. Overall they should be effective in making walking and cycling to school more attractive and reducing car use. We know many more schools are calling for these measures and look forward to seeing plans for the ‘phase 2’ schools being brought forward without delay.

We have a few queries and suggestions:

1) Do all the schools have cycle training? We think this is essential to complement the physical measures.

2) Could the scheme at Tiverton Primary be expanded to include Pulford Rd and the full length of Fladbury Rd? Closing the road to cars only in front of the school, will not be very effective.

3) The scheme drawings should note the existing cycle contra-flow at Bishopswood Rd (Highgate Junior) and Barratt Avenue (St Paul’s RC Primary).

4) Could there be cycle contra-flow permitted at Halefield Rd and Glendish Rd, for cycle access to Harris Primary Academy?

5) Will the proposed pavement widening at Everington Rd (Coldfal Primary) have a dropped kerb to maintain cycle access to the school?

6) At Highgate Primary, is the slip road to North Hill included as a school street? It is noted for markings but is not coloured green. As previously suggested, cycle contraflow should be allowed at the slip road.

7) The Nightingale Lane school street (Campsbourne Schools) is too short, leaving “school run” parking only a short distance from the schools. Could Hawthorn and North View roads become school streets, with Nightingale Lane extended to the junction with Beechwood Road? This would be possible with the same number of cameras as the existing scheme.

8) We suggest the scheme for Rokesly Primary could be improved if Rokesly Avenue could be a school street. This might increase traffic diverting to Rosebery Rd and Elder Avenue, however Rokesly Avenue and Elmfield Avenue will continue to be used by buses during school street hours, so this would seem reasonable.

We are pleased to note these schemes are being monitored for the trial period and trust any adverse impacts can be mitigated by measures put in place as needed. Many of the schemes could become part of future LTN’s.

There could be a very effective “mini LTN” at Highgate Primary, to include closing the narrow one-way section of Storey Road to motor traffic and replacing the narrow and convoluted footpath to Sheldon Avenue by a wider and well-lit direct connection, for pedestrians and cycles.

Yours sincerely,
Michael Poteliakhoff
for Haringey Cycling Campaign

cc Cllr Matt White, Neil Goldberg, Maurice Richards, Calum Jacobs, Simi Shah

Light segregation using wands on Philip Lane
news

The cycle superhighway 1 revamp: will it get any better?

Cycle superhighway 1 (CS1) is approaching its fifth birthday. The route, which is the only fully-signed cycle route in the borough, runs from Tottenham to the City and should be a key commuter line for the east of Haringey and Hackney. Sadly, it has earned a reputation for epitomising all the compromises and bodges that went into the early cycle superhighways, with a lack of meaningful protection for cyclists. Haringey council has recently won £604,152 under TfL’s emergency Covid infrastructure scheme to upgrade their section of the route. Here we take a look at the proposed improvements.

The Haringey section of the route enters the borough in South Tottenham, running along Holmdale Terrace and St Ann’s Road before winding around some back roads to join the A10 pavement. There are multiple problems on this section of the route, with too much traffic for comfortable cycling and a narrow shared pavement under the railway bridge on the A10. After some relief on a decent cycle track, we get to one of the worst parts of the route. At Seven Sisters, there are multiple sets of traffic lights and the limited space is shared by people walking and cycling. This is especially bad on the section of pavement crowded with people boarding buses or getting onto the tube at Seven Sisters station. Bolder cyclists often forgo the whole experience and take to the busy junction instead.

After more cycling on the pavement, CS1 then routes onto Philip Lane. Here there have been some retrospective improvements: light segregation with wands. However, the cycle lane disappears at bus stops and southbound riders have to cut across traffic to turn onto Town Hall Approach Road. The route then winds up residential streets in Bruce Grove, running parallel to the A10. There is no protection for cyclists where the route crosses the busier roads of The Avenue and Lordship Lane, both of which involve navigating two lanes of robust traffic to make a right turn. Cyclists are required to use roads that have significant amounts of through motor traffic using the area as a shortcut, including in the opposite direction.

Light segregation using wands on Philip Lane
Light segregation using wands on Philip Lane

 

Southbound cyclists must cut across traffic to access Town Hall Approach Road, where the route continues
Southbound cyclists must cut across traffic to access Town Hall Approach Road, where the route continues
Cyclists need to cross two lanes of brisk traffic at Lordship Lane
Cyclists need to cross two lanes of brisk traffic at Lordship Lane
The entire route was originally proposed to be a straight run along the A10. As a compromise, it ended up winding along ‘quiet’ backstreets. Whilst a few sections of the route offer improvements for people who were already prepared to cycle, it falls very short of the oft-cited safety standard: something you’d be willing to let your 12-year-old cycle on.

Haringey’s successful funding bid proposes some edits to CS1:

  • Adding modal filtering on Broadwater Lane, one of the residential streets in Bruce Grove. TfL consulted on a similar proposal in 2015, with 67% support, but decided not to pursue the scheme.
  • Adding temporary ‘bus stop boarders’ on Philip Lane. It is vital to separate buses and cycles for a cycle route to be truly inclusive – most people feel very vulnerable moving out of the cycle lane into traffic to overtake a stopped bus. Waltham Forest cyclists have an explainer for the various solutions for bus stop/cycle track conflict, and whilst bus stop boarders are their least preferred option, Philip Lane may be too narrow for alternatives.
  • At Seven Sisters, to “relocate cycle track and shared-use track away from queue hotspots”. This falls short: there needs to be dedicated cycle space here, protected from cars and distinct from pedestrian areas; the area is simply too busy for any shared space to work. It is positive that Haringey council acknowledge the problem, but the true solution is likely to involve a significant amount of work, for example moving the entire route to the east side of the road to better integrate with the proposed cycle route from Tottenham to Camden.
  • Unspecified “cycling improvements” between Ermine Road and Holmdale Terrace. To make this part of the route truly inclusive, it needs far less through traffic on it.

Lacking from the proposals are:

  • Any plans to reroute sections onto the A10; we’re stuck with the backstreets strategy for now.
  • Any additional protection at the points where the route crosses busier roads (St Ann’s Road, The Avenue, Lordship Lane). These junctions are the limiting factor that would prevent a less-bold cyclist from using the route. As long as these busy points remain, improvements to other parts of the route are likely to be of limited value.
  • Any protection for people turning right from Philip Lane onto Town Hall Approach.
  • Improvements to the narrow contraflows on the route; for example, by moving car parking spaces.

Separately, Haringey have won funding for an extension to CS1, carrying it further north to the borough boundary with Enfield. Done properly, this could link into Enfield mini-Holland, give people in Ponders End a route into the the City, and allow cycle access for people travelling to North Middlesex Hospital from Haringey.

Map of the proposed CS1 extension (from Haringey's bid documents)
Map of the proposed CS1 extension (from Haringey’s bid documents)

The alterations proposed to create a CS1 extension are:

  • Partial parking bay suspension – Queen Street & White Hart Lane
  • New two-way cycle track on Bull Lane or footway widening (shared-use path)
  • Road closure in Beaufoy Road changed to modal filter
  • Narrowing of carriageway
  • Decluttering and Wayfinding

It is encouraging that Haringey are considering adding cycle track on Bull Lane; although, as Bull Lane is in Enfield (the same street is called Queen Street in Haringey) it isn’t clear whether any of this track would actually be in Haringey.

At Beaufoy Road, Haringey’s proposal is to replace the existing road closure barrier with a modal filter. However, the existing barrier already prevents rat-running traffic and so many cyclists will notice no difference here.

Furthermore, the new extension again fails to offer any solutions at junctions with busy roads. Specifically, there is no protection when crossing White Hart Lane.  And again, Haringey has chosen to route along side streets. On entering Enfield the route will have park on one side and industrial units on the other; potentially a deserted and therefore intimidating environment, particularly for female cyclists using the route in the evenings.

Haringey Cyclists has sent the council our proposal for how Haringey can deliver on their bid and address the other problems on this route. Let’s see if they can keep the promise of ‘a much-improved north-south link in the east of the borough reducing the burden on public transport by providing a viable alternative to private car use’. We hope these extraordinary times might lead to Haringey having at least one decent cycle route.  But it looks like CS1 may hit its fifth birthday with little to celebrate.

news

Haringey draft transport strategy consultation: our response

Haringey’s draft transport strategy comes at a vital time for London and its boroughs. As the Mayor of London makes clear in his own plans for transport in London, a shift away from car-based travel is absolutely vital to prevent congestion getting out of control and an escalation of existing public health problems related to poor air quality and inactivity.

With the population of this borough expected to rise significantly over the coming years, it’s clear that ‘do nothing’ is not an option. In order to prevent gridlock, a significant shift to transport modes that make better use of existing space – walking, cycling and public transport – is required. Added to the negative impacts of road congestion, there is a substantial and growing understanding of the negative health impacts of an inactive, car-based population. Currently 2/3rds of all journeys by car in London are less than 5km, a distance that is easily cycled or walked in around 20 minutes. Cycling for just 20 minutes a day has been shown to bring astonishing health improvements, greater than other moderate activities, because cycling encourages people to exert themselves for example when they encounter a hill or set off from traffic lights. Like walking, cycling for transport is an ‘incidental activity’ – exercise that is built into everyday life, not an additional burden on your discretionary time like other exercise can be.

Cycling is for everyone, now more so than ever. Adapted cycles are helping people with mobility issues for whom cycling can be easier than walking. New technologies like e-bikes are opening up opportunities for active transport to those who can’t or don’t want to overexert themselves and e-assist cargo cycles are bringing forward exciting opportunities for freight consolidation. New developments in dockless bike hire technology mean that not owning a bike is no longer a barrier to cycling. Currently just 8% of 243,700 potential cycle trips in this borough are being made by bike. The key to unlocking this enormous, untapped potential is putting cycle infrastructure in place to support it.

We look forward to seeing detailed plans and targets for how cycling growth will be supported in the forthcoming cycling and walking strategy. As the 2015/16 review by the Environment and Community Scrutiny Panel correctly identified, motor traffic speed and volume is the greatest discouragement to cycling. The overriding focus of the Cycling and Walking Strategy needs to be delivery of a dense cycle network that is entirely separated from fast or heavy traffic flows, complemented with the creation of low, or no-traffic neighbourhoods. This is the only proven way to deliver a step-change in cycling levels on a population scale, with encouraging results from Haringey’s neighbouring boroughs showing that this rings true even in places more car dependent than Haringey.

Haringey is well placed to make progress in this area. The borough already has several low-traffic neighbourhoods, relatively low (and falling) car ownership and high proportion of trips are already made by walking or public transport. In places there is a vestigial cycle network, but such networks are only as good as their weakest link, with junctions a particular failing. The challenge over the coming years is to make complete routes that offer a consistent standard from end-to-end.

It’s clear that this won’t be easy – the issue is one of urban space and how best to use it. Despite overwhelming evidence that cycling is good for people and business, the difficult choices that need to be made to enable all-ages cycling means tough choices to change how our urban space is allocated. Change always meets with resistance, and it’s clear from other boroughs making progress towards fairer, more liveable streets, that a minority of people will never be satisfied with any reallocation of road space to cycling. Strong support from all levels of local government is required to deliver outcomes that match strategic goals. An attempt to satisfy everyone often leads to outcomes that please no-one. Haringey’s resulting strategy needs to be followed through root and branch with delivery of all transport-related projects in the borough. From minor residential development to even the smallest highways amendment, the question needs to be asked – how will this help deliver Haringey’s stated goals? Delivery needs to match strategic aspirations every time, or opportunities to improve our borough will continue to be missed, to the detriment of us all.

Uncategorized

UPDATE – Haringey Cycling Campaign – views on proposals for Middle Lane/Park Road junction

UPDATE 17 Nov – we received the news last night that the proposal for a mini-roundabout has been dropped. We look forward to seeing an alternative proposal come forward.

Haringey Cycling Campaign were first consulted on these proposals in July this year. We objected at that time on the grounds that the proposals were not compliant with Transport for London’s London Cycle Design Standards (LCDS) and as such would be detrimental to the safety of people cycling through this junction. At that time we suggested an alternative light-touch junction alteration, pending a more extensive area-wide scheme being brought forward, would be to place the existing zebra crossings on raised tables to slow vehicle speeds and improve safety for all road users.

LCDS, paragraph 5.5.4 states: Mini-roundabouts are not generally recommended for inclusion on cycle routes. The main problems they raise are failure of vehicles to observe give way due to the geometry and failure to reduce speed through the junction. Where they exist, they should be considered for replacement where they have more than one entry lane and/or where there is an angle approaching 180 degrees between the entry and exit arms (and therefore little horizontal deflection).

Collision statistics for the last 5 years at this location (2 slightly injured cyclists, 2 slightly injured pedestrians and one slightly injured motorcycle rider, all in collision with motor vehicles, with no recorded injuries at this junction since 2013) suggest that this junction is not exceptionally dangerous in the context of other nearby junctions. It is probable that some of these injuries to cyclists and pedestrians were caused by failure of vehicles to observe give way… and failure to reduce speed through the junction. A mini-roundabout at this location, given the proposal includes an angle approaching 180 degrees between the entry and exit arms and other issues described by LCDS, is likely to increase such risks to vulnerable road users.

We formally objected by email again on 2 November, adding that in addition to the issues described above, this scheme may jeopardise the recent bid for Liveable Neighbourhoods funding for Crouch End, given that the design principles for Liveable Neighbourhoods specifically require adherence to TfL’s ‘Streets Toolkit’, including LCDS.

In the longer term we would like to see a scheme put forward that minimises or eliminates turning conflicts at this junction. A more ambitious scheme could deliver this alongside increased green space, including sustainable drainage features to unlock multiple benefits to people and the environment at this location. The proposal for a mini-roundabout is dangerous and should not be taken forward.

news

Suggest a Bikehangar location in Haringey

We’re receiving a lot of requests via Twitter and email, asking how to request secure cycle parking in your road, so thought we better create a ‘How to’ guide!

BsnwHRxIcAASxDm

Grand opening of the Warwick Gardens Bikehangar – the first in Haringey. There was a waiting list for spaces within a week.

What is a ‘bikehangar’?

Good question. They’re actually called ‘The Lambeth Bikehangar’ but don’t let that put you off – they can live in Haringey too, and some already do!

More info via Cyclehoop, who supply and install the units:  Bikehangar is an award-winning popular design for outdoor sites offering a safe and effective way to protect bikes from tough weather conditions and vandalism where storage space is limited. The gas assisted door makes accessing your bike simple, reducing effort when opening the hangar. Furthermore, the galvanized steel frame acts to protect your bike from the elements as well as theft.

Btv76A4IgAAZU7u

It is an effective street de-cluttering design which can store up to six bicycles and only occupies half a parking space. The Lambeth Bikehangar is very popular with councils, who can purchase it and rent out cycle parking spaces to local residents. If you are a resident interested in renting a space in a Lambeth Bikehangar, please search for the one closest to you or request one to be installed on your road here.

Find out more on the Cyclehoop website. 

Where are they in Haringey?

As of April 2018, there are now 54 Bikehangars installed in the borough of Haringey. Full details of locations can be found on Cyclehoop’s website.

How do I request one for where I live?

The more requests for a Bikehangar in a specific location, the more likely it will happen, so knock on your neighbours’ doors and get them involved! Full details are available on Haringey Council’s website, which has some helpful tips to make sure your application has the best chance of success, but do also make sure you do the following:

  1. Send an email to cycle.parking@haringey.gov.uk Copy us in: haringey@lcc.org.uk  AND your local ward councillors for Haringey. Click here to find out their email addresses
  2. You might want to check if your local councillors supports Space for Cycling in their ward first
  3. You could also suggest a location, by filling in the form on the Cyclehoop website. Cyclehoop will give a report to Haringey Council and a map of the requested locations.

Bikehangars in the wild….

B8Sru5HIIAEi1Va

Here’s a fine example of a modal filter and Bikehangar just over the border in Hackney on Finsbury Park Road.

Want to request a location for a sheffield stand? Email cycle.parking@haringey.gov.uk (expect an autoreply). Try to include a photo or Streetview link of where you would like the stand, and state why you think one (or more) should be installed. 

Want more advice? Tweet @haringeycyclist or email Haringey@lcc.org.uk