School street in operation in Haringey
news

School Streets 2021

Haringey has introduced two School Streets and more are planned for the summer term. Haringey Cycling Campaign welcomes this move and has written to the council saying so – and suggesting some improvements.

A School Street is a timed street closure during drop-off and pick-up times outside a school. Usually these last for 1-1.5 hours at the start and end of the school day, tailored to each school’s start and finish times. The School Streets will operate Monday-Friday during term times.

Only people walking and cycling, and those with vehicle exemption permits are eligible to enter the zone. Anyone else driving into the zone during the stated times will receive a fine. You do not need to have an exemption permit to exit from the School Street.

There are two ways that Haringey is operating the School Streets:

Volunteer-led School Streets

Some School Streets will be operated by volunteers who are members of the school community. They will extend a barrier across the street while the School Street is in operation and marshal the barrier to allow permitted vehicles into and out of the street.

To support the volunteers, enforcement officers sometimes help to monitor compliance.

Camera Enforced School Streets

These School Streets will not physically block access to motor vehicles, instead they will be monitored using Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras (ANPR). These cameras monitor the number plates of the vehicles that drive into the street and administer fines if the vehicle is not registered for a permit. The penalty charge issued for driving into a School Street is £130, reduced to £65 if paid within 14 days.

Existing School Streets

School Streets being introduced in the summer term 2021

Haringey Cycling Campaign has written the following letter to the council welcoming the new school streets and suggesting some improvements:

HCC warmly welcomes the eleven school streets schemes due to be implemented this summer. Overall they should be effective in making walking and cycling to school more attractive and reducing car use. We know many more schools are calling for these measures and look forward to seeing plans for the ‘phase 2’ schools being brought forward without delay.

We have a few queries and suggestions:

1) Do all the schools have cycle training? We think this is essential to complement the physical measures.

2) Could the scheme at Tiverton Primary be expanded to include Pulford Rd and the full length of Fladbury Rd? Closing the road to cars only in front of the school, will not be very effective.

3) The scheme drawings should note the existing cycle contra-flow at Bishopswood Rd (Highgate Junior) and Barratt Avenue (St Paul’s RC Primary).

4) Could there be cycle contra-flow permitted at Halefield Rd and Glendish Rd, for cycle access to Harris Primary Academy?

5) Will the proposed pavement widening at Everington Rd (Coldfal Primary) have a dropped kerb to maintain cycle access to the school?

6) At Highgate Primary, is the slip road to North Hill included as a school street? It is noted for markings but is not coloured green. As previously suggested, cycle contraflow should be allowed at the slip road.

7) The Nightingale Lane school street (Campsbourne Schools) is too short, leaving “school run” parking only a short distance from the schools. Could Hawthorn and North View roads become school streets, with Nightingale Lane extended to the junction with Beechwood Road? This would be possible with the same number of cameras as the existing scheme.

8) We suggest the scheme for Rokesly Primary could be improved if Rokesly Avenue could be a school street. This might increase traffic diverting to Rosebery Rd and Elder Avenue, however Rokesly Avenue and Elmfield Avenue will continue to be used by buses during school street hours, so this would seem reasonable.

We are pleased to note these schemes are being monitored for the trial period and trust any adverse impacts can be mitigated by measures put in place as needed. Many of the schemes could become part of future LTN’s.

There could be a very effective “mini LTN” at Highgate Primary, to include closing the narrow one-way section of Storey Road to motor traffic and replacing the narrow and convoluted footpath to Sheldon Avenue by a wider and well-lit direct connection, for pedestrians and cycles.

Yours sincerely,
Michael Poteliakhoff
for Haringey Cycling Campaign

cc Cllr Matt White, Neil Goldberg, Maurice Richards, Calum Jacobs, Simi Shah

Light segregation using wands on Philip Lane
news

The cycle superhighway 1 revamp: will it get any better?

Cycle superhighway 1 (CS1) is approaching its fifth birthday. The route, which is the only fully-signed cycle route in the borough, runs from Tottenham to the City and should be a key commuter line for the east of Haringey and Hackney. Sadly, it has earned a reputation for epitomising all the compromises and bodges that went into the early cycle superhighways, with a lack of meaningful protection for cyclists. Haringey council has recently won £604,152 under TfL’s emergency Covid infrastructure scheme to upgrade their section of the route. Here we take a look at the proposed improvements.

The Haringey section of the route enters the borough in South Tottenham, running along Holmdale Terrace and St Ann’s Road before winding around some back roads to join the A10 pavement. There are multiple problems on this section of the route, with too much traffic for comfortable cycling and a narrow shared pavement under the railway bridge on the A10. After some relief on a decent cycle track, we get to one of the worst parts of the route. At Seven Sisters, there are multiple sets of traffic lights and the limited space is shared by people walking and cycling. This is especially bad on the section of pavement crowded with people boarding buses or getting onto the tube at Seven Sisters station. Bolder cyclists often forgo the whole experience and take to the busy junction instead.

After more cycling on the pavement, CS1 then routes onto Philip Lane. Here there have been some retrospective improvements: light segregation with wands. However, the cycle lane disappears at bus stops and southbound riders have to cut across traffic to turn onto Town Hall Approach Road. The route then winds up residential streets in Bruce Grove, running parallel to the A10. There is no protection for cyclists where the route crosses the busier roads of The Avenue and Lordship Lane, both of which involve navigating two lanes of robust traffic to make a right turn. Cyclists are required to use roads that have significant amounts of through motor traffic using the area as a shortcut, including in the opposite direction.

Light segregation using wands on Philip Lane
Light segregation using wands on Philip Lane

 

Southbound cyclists must cut across traffic to access Town Hall Approach Road, where the route continues
Southbound cyclists must cut across traffic to access Town Hall Approach Road, where the route continues
Cyclists need to cross two lanes of brisk traffic at Lordship Lane
Cyclists need to cross two lanes of brisk traffic at Lordship Lane
The entire route was originally proposed to be a straight run along the A10. As a compromise, it ended up winding along ‘quiet’ backstreets. Whilst a few sections of the route offer improvements for people who were already prepared to cycle, it falls very short of the oft-cited safety standard: something you’d be willing to let your 12-year-old cycle on.

Haringey’s successful funding bid proposes some edits to CS1:

  • Adding modal filtering on Broadwater Lane, one of the residential streets in Bruce Grove. TfL consulted on a similar proposal in 2015, with 67% support, but decided not to pursue the scheme.
  • Adding temporary ‘bus stop boarders’ on Philip Lane. It is vital to separate buses and cycles for a cycle route to be truly inclusive – most people feel very vulnerable moving out of the cycle lane into traffic to overtake a stopped bus. Waltham Forest cyclists have an explainer for the various solutions for bus stop/cycle track conflict, and whilst bus stop boarders are their least preferred option, Philip Lane may be too narrow for alternatives.
  • At Seven Sisters, to “relocate cycle track and shared-use track away from queue hotspots”. This falls short: there needs to be dedicated cycle space here, protected from cars and distinct from pedestrian areas; the area is simply too busy for any shared space to work. It is positive that Haringey council acknowledge the problem, but the true solution is likely to involve a significant amount of work, for example moving the entire route to the east side of the road to better integrate with the proposed cycle route from Tottenham to Camden.
  • Unspecified “cycling improvements” between Ermine Road and Holmdale Terrace. To make this part of the route truly inclusive, it needs far less through traffic on it.

Lacking from the proposals are:

  • Any plans to reroute sections onto the A10; we’re stuck with the backstreets strategy for now.
  • Any additional protection at the points where the route crosses busier roads (St Ann’s Road, The Avenue, Lordship Lane). These junctions are the limiting factor that would prevent a less-bold cyclist from using the route. As long as these busy points remain, improvements to other parts of the route are likely to be of limited value.
  • Any protection for people turning right from Philip Lane onto Town Hall Approach.
  • Improvements to the narrow contraflows on the route; for example, by moving car parking spaces.

Separately, Haringey have won funding for an extension to CS1, carrying it further north to the borough boundary with Enfield. Done properly, this could link into Enfield mini-Holland, give people in Ponders End a route into the the City, and allow cycle access for people travelling to North Middlesex Hospital from Haringey.

Map of the proposed CS1 extension (from Haringey's bid documents)
Map of the proposed CS1 extension (from Haringey’s bid documents)

The alterations proposed to create a CS1 extension are:

  • Partial parking bay suspension – Queen Street & White Hart Lane
  • New two-way cycle track on Bull Lane or footway widening (shared-use path)
  • Road closure in Beaufoy Road changed to modal filter
  • Narrowing of carriageway
  • Decluttering and Wayfinding

It is encouraging that Haringey are considering adding cycle track on Bull Lane; although, as Bull Lane is in Enfield (the same street is called Queen Street in Haringey) it isn’t clear whether any of this track would actually be in Haringey.

At Beaufoy Road, Haringey’s proposal is to replace the existing road closure barrier with a modal filter. However, the existing barrier already prevents rat-running traffic and so many cyclists will notice no difference here.

Furthermore, the new extension again fails to offer any solutions at junctions with busy roads. Specifically, there is no protection when crossing White Hart Lane.  And again, Haringey has chosen to route along side streets. On entering Enfield the route will have park on one side and industrial units on the other; potentially a deserted and therefore intimidating environment, particularly for female cyclists using the route in the evenings.

Haringey Cyclists has sent the council our proposal for how Haringey can deliver on their bid and address the other problems on this route. Let’s see if they can keep the promise of ‘a much-improved north-south link in the east of the borough reducing the burden on public transport by providing a viable alternative to private car use’. We hope these extraordinary times might lead to Haringey having at least one decent cycle route.  But it looks like CS1 may hit its fifth birthday with little to celebrate.

news

Haringey draft transport strategy consultation: our response

Haringey’s draft transport strategy comes at a vital time for London and its boroughs. As the Mayor of London makes clear in his own plans for transport in London, a shift away from car-based travel is absolutely vital to prevent congestion getting out of control and an escalation of existing public health problems related to poor air quality and inactivity.

With the population of this borough expected to rise significantly over the coming years, it’s clear that ‘do nothing’ is not an option. In order to prevent gridlock, a significant shift to transport modes that make better use of existing space – walking, cycling and public transport – is required. Added to the negative impacts of road congestion, there is a substantial and growing understanding of the negative health impacts of an inactive, car-based population. Currently 2/3rds of all journeys by car in London are less than 5km, a distance that is easily cycled or walked in around 20 minutes. Cycling for just 20 minutes a day has been shown to bring astonishing health improvements, greater than other moderate activities, because cycling encourages people to exert themselves for example when they encounter a hill or set off from traffic lights. Like walking, cycling for transport is an ‘incidental activity’ – exercise that is built into everyday life, not an additional burden on your discretionary time like other exercise can be.

Cycling is for everyone, now more so than ever. Adapted cycles are helping people with mobility issues for whom cycling can be easier than walking. New technologies like e-bikes are opening up opportunities for active transport to those who can’t or don’t want to overexert themselves and e-assist cargo cycles are bringing forward exciting opportunities for freight consolidation. New developments in dockless bike hire technology mean that not owning a bike is no longer a barrier to cycling. Currently just 8% of 243,700 potential cycle trips in this borough are being made by bike. The key to unlocking this enormous, untapped potential is putting cycle infrastructure in place to support it.

We look forward to seeing detailed plans and targets for how cycling growth will be supported in the forthcoming cycling and walking strategy. As the 2015/16 review by the Environment and Community Scrutiny Panel correctly identified, motor traffic speed and volume is the greatest discouragement to cycling. The overriding focus of the Cycling and Walking Strategy needs to be delivery of a dense cycle network that is entirely separated from fast or heavy traffic flows, complemented with the creation of low, or no-traffic neighbourhoods. This is the only proven way to deliver a step-change in cycling levels on a population scale, with encouraging results from Haringey’s neighbouring boroughs showing that this rings true even in places more car dependent than Haringey.

Haringey is well placed to make progress in this area. The borough already has several low-traffic neighbourhoods, relatively low (and falling) car ownership and high proportion of trips are already made by walking or public transport. In places there is a vestigial cycle network, but such networks are only as good as their weakest link, with junctions a particular failing. The challenge over the coming years is to make complete routes that offer a consistent standard from end-to-end.

It’s clear that this won’t be easy – the issue is one of urban space and how best to use it. Despite overwhelming evidence that cycling is good for people and business, the difficult choices that need to be made to enable all-ages cycling means tough choices to change how our urban space is allocated. Change always meets with resistance, and it’s clear from other boroughs making progress towards fairer, more liveable streets, that a minority of people will never be satisfied with any reallocation of road space to cycling. Strong support from all levels of local government is required to deliver outcomes that match strategic goals. An attempt to satisfy everyone often leads to outcomes that please no-one. Haringey’s resulting strategy needs to be followed through root and branch with delivery of all transport-related projects in the borough. From minor residential development to even the smallest highways amendment, the question needs to be asked – how will this help deliver Haringey’s stated goals? Delivery needs to match strategic aspirations every time, or opportunities to improve our borough will continue to be missed, to the detriment of us all.

consultations, news

Support Wightman Road filtering – complete the council survey by this Sunday 14 May!

‘Daddy, can we please cycle to Finsbury Park again this weekend?’

wightman photo

Last summer extraordinary things happened in one part of Haringey. It was a summer of fun for kids: on roads and streets where before there was only bad air and road traffic noise, now there was the sound of kids playing out. Street football was a daily occurrence, children were using the road to cycle to school and there was even the occasional lemonade stand. It wasn’t just children who were joining in with being more active. Adults across this large area realised they didn’t really need the car for their shorter journeys – walking was nearly as fast and made them feel pretty good now the air was cleaner. Cycling to Finsbury Park to pick up the tube was quicker than the bus and nicer than cramming onto the packed trains, and getting there on a bike suddenly seemed easy now the journey could be done mostly without having to ride with speeding traffic.

Surely this was all the work of a council fully committed to the health of their residents, the sort that would make bold claims about making their borough the most liveable in London? Sadly this utopia did not last. While other boroughs nearby were permanently closing roads to through traffic to entrench a new, healthier lifestyle in their boroughs, Wightman Road and its adjoining roads were reopened as through routes for motor traffic. The weekend bike rides to the park had to stop.

‘I’m sorry. There’s no safe way to cycle there now’.

As a cycle campaign we are of course primarily interested in high quality provision for cycling that allows anyone to feel confident using a bike to get around. This has been the focus of our continuing engagement in the Green Lanes Area Transport Study. There are many ways to achieve this but many options that improve conditions for people on bikes also have much wider benefits for those in the area – even if they never cycle. For example making areas more healthy and liveable, reducing air pollution and even reducing journey times for drivers by lowering overall traffic levels and simplifying routes. If you live in or travel through Harringay or the Green Lanes area, you have until Sunday to complete the council survey on future options for Wightman Road and the surrounding area. We believe this is an issue primarily for local people to decide, so please take a look at Living Wightman’s advice on how to complete the survey. While some of the options presented can deliver a suitable cycle route (in particular we recommend you support the proposal for a northbound cycle track on Green Lanes, desperately needed in an area with no safe north/south routes), the option to ‘filter’ Wightman Road will deliver multiple health and air quality benefits as well as a safe route suitable for all-ages cycling. Many parts of this borough are already ‘filtered’ to through traffic. Other boroughs which are right next to Haringey are showing how such schemes, if well managed, can reduce traffic over a wide area. The use of Wightman Road as a conduit for through traffic has negative consequences for the areas to the north and south that also have long-standing issues with excessive through traffic.

The council’s response to the issues encountered on Wightman Road is a real test for them – are they serious about tackling pollution and unlocking the massive potential for active travel in this borough? Or, as suggested by the recent consultation on the Wood Green AAP, is the future of our borough just as polluted, congested and unhealthy as our present? This is your chance to tell the council what sort of place you want this borough to evolve into. Don’t miss the chance to have your voice heard.

 

consultations, news

Bruce Grove Consultation – urgent action needed!

Transport for London are currently consulting on changes to the A10 at Bruce Grove (from the rail station south to Forster Road). The consultation is open until 7 December, please have your say via https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/bruce-grove/

These proposals were discussed at Haringey Cycling Campaign’s monthly meeting on the 14 November. Unfortunately, we found very little to recommend from a cycling perspective. The junction treatment outside Bruce Grove station is likely to benefit pedestrians and to a lesser extent those on bikes. However, in our view the remainder of the proposed work would decrease safety for people cycling, and as such we are requesting TfL go back to the drawing board and come back with something much better. Our reasoning is set out below – you may wish to raise these points in your response. Remember the consultation closes on 7 December!

The proposals include a dangerous and unnecessary pinch point
The new signalised pedestrian crossing proposes to narrow the existing carriageway width to 3m in each direction. We object to this creation of a pinch point, which seems unnecessary for pedestrian safety as the proposed crossing is signalised. We are concerned that the proposed narrowing will increase conflict between road users – in theory cycles should “take the lane” to prevent dangerous overtaking but this would only be a sensible approach on a road with light volumes of traffic travelling at low speeds. For what we think are obvious reasons, this approach is not applicable to this situation.

Proposals remove existing cycle provision
There is an existing cycle route (LCN 54) that crosses the High Rd at St Loys Rd. In 2003 and 2006 detailed proposals were made, but not implemented, to upgrade this crossing. There are presently cycle reservations to the north and south of the junction, which are at least some assistance in crossing the High Road. The present proposals include the removal of the south reservation and this is not an acceptable alteration as no replacement provision is shown.

Current proposals are incompatible with increasing cycle numbers
A 2007 Transport for London scheme for the A10 from Monument Way to St Loys Rd, consulted on but not implemented, included cycle lanes. There remains ample road space for comprehensive cycle provision. Indeed, as part of implementing Mini Holland, Enfield are currently consulting on a proposal for protected cycle tracks on the A1010 up to the Haringey border. Cycle Superhighway 1 does not provide a suitable alternative route, particularly with the decision not to filter through traffic on Broadwater Road. The A10 at Bruce Grove is and will remain heavily used by cycles: Planning policy for Tottenham regeneration seeks to reduce private car use and improving cycle provision in Enfield and Waltham Forest means that the ambition for the A10 should be as a main cycle route.

We therefore urge that these proposals are either redesigned or not taken forward as part of this scheme.

consultations, news

CS1 response

Last chance to have your say on Haringey’s Cycle Superhighway

Here’s our proposed response to Transport for London’s Cycle Superhighway route 1 (CS1) consultation which ends on Sunday.

The response below is a draft on behalf of Haringey Cycling Campaign and London Cycling Campaign  – there may be minor edits after the London Cycling Campaign IRG (Infrastructure Review Group) meeting on Thursday 26th March.

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Proposed 2-way cycle track on the western pavement of the High Road between West Green Road and Town Hall Approach, lanes separated by trees (which already exist)

 

We feel there are many problems with the present proposals.

TfL are already reconsidering the South section of the route through Haringey, following our objections to the St Ann’s Road alignment.

Hopefully there will also be a rethink on the centre section from South Tottenham station, past Seven Sisters Road to Philip Lane, which includes sections of shared space on the pavement outside a busy Seven Sisters underground station entrance and High Road bus stop – where local cyclists have recently been stopped from cycling by MPS Haringey (although the acting Inspector has since apologised by email and sent a memo to all neighbourhood team reminding officers what a shared use space sign looks like).

Please let TfL know your views! The deadline for responses is Sunday the 29th March.

CS1 consultation event in Marcus Garvey library
CS1 consultation event in Marcus Garvey library

 

The TfL consultation documents can be found at  https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/cycling/cs1

 

Our full draft response can be read here – with section by section notes: CS1 notes LCC.HCC

Our thoughts and sketch for a protected right turn at Philip Lane in to Town Hall Approach can be found here: Philip Lane Protected Right

A very well written response to the proposals by Tottenham Civic Society can be read here: Tottenham Civic Society – CS1

Here's how busy the current shared space is - even busier when students are arriving and leaving College of North East London. The large tree planter CANNOT be removed or reduced so all pedestrians and cyclists using CS1's proposed route will be funnelled to the right of this tree, where everyone is walking.
Here’s how busy the current shared space is – even busier when students are arriving and leaving College of North East London. The large tree planter CANNOT be removed or reduced so all pedestrians and cyclists using CS1’s proposed route will be funnelled to the right of this tree, where everyone is walking.
consultations, news

Cycle Superhighway 1 – our letter to Haringey Council

B9_HmjJCMAIhkw3UPDATE: Keep a look out for how to respond to the CS1 consultation – WE WILL NEED YOUR SUPPORT.

Here’s the proposed  two-way cycle track on the pavement on the High Road north of Seven Sisters.

What to know what we think of the latest plans? Here’s our letter to Haringey Council regarding the proposed alignment of Cycle Superhighway 1:

Dear Malcolm,

1st February 2015

TfL have recently issued revised drawings for CS1.  The trees which encroached on the cycle path near Seven Sisters Underground have been relocated and parking which obstructed access to the contra flow near Lordship Lane has been removed, however it seems no other comments from LCC/ HCC have been addressed and apart from these points the drawings appear identical to those issued before.   The new drawings have been reviewed by the LCC Infrastructure Review Group (IRG) and it was agreed points as below would be raised in the forthcoming TfL Design Review Group.  We will keep you informed of any comments from LCC.
CS1, Haringey
As stated previously the alignment does not make sense. If this alignment is used there are a number of issues to address:-
1) Modal filter needed at Frinton Rd
2) Frinton to St Ann’s Rd is a right turn onto a hugely busy road – must be signalised and segregated
3) In the High Rd at the rail bridge, the reduced 2.5m pavement width on the east side of the toucan is not suitable. The toucan should be moved closer to the Crowland Rd Junction.
4) The “stepping stone” markings proposed look confusing, with no clarity for pedestrian or cycle priority. Not appropriate for a cycle superhighway to go through a shared use area – it is a busy area and there will be conflict.
5) High Rd/Seven Sisters Rd needs to be a cycle segregated T Junction, with one phase, not toucans.
6) Cycle friendly signal control needed at West Green Rd junction as LCDS Fig 4.9 options 1 and 2 to allow movements, as shown in HCC drawing.
7) Proximity of Underground exits serious risk of conflict – pedestrians both sides. Peds will need a crossing point to get into the Underground and clear signage.
8) Outside College of North East London: raised tree planter is used as informal seating by students. Major risk of conflict and lack of continuity. Need to reconfigure tree pit or purchase land from College.
9) Where the roads split and CS1 goes up Town Hall Approach Rd: this is a very busy narrow section of one way road: when buses are stopped here cyclists won’t be able to pass. Need to let cyclists onto the paved area to overtake buses, to feed in to re-configured straight across toucan to join to local E/W cycle route.
10) Need to provide hatched centre line marking at TH Approach all traffic 2-way section, to ensure awareness of oncoming traffic.
11) Junction of Town Hall Approach Rd and Philip Lane is a busy junction. Philip Lane needs proper segregation – junction should be cycle segregated leading into protected tracks. Armadillos or wands may work here – stepped tracks wouldn’t be acceptable if there is a risk that they would be parked on. All of Philip Lane (pages 13, 14, 15) needs segregation.
12) Strode Rd into Sperling Rd – only about 3m wide – entirely unsuitable to share with pedestrians
13) At Lordship Lane bus stop conflicts with S bound cycle 2-stage turn. Move bus stop to other side of Broadwater Rd junction. Cyclists turning right into a major road will require control (lights).
14) Lordship Lane needs two toucans synchronised to get cyclists across. This would eradicate need for traffic islands with cycle bollards, allowing room for segregated tracks.
HCC lobbied strongly for CS1 to avoid St Ann’s Rd, but now that it is definitely following this alignment, it needs to be made as cycle friendly as possible.  Another major concern to HCC, is the design of the junctions in the area of Seven Sisters Station and the related pedestrian areas.  It seems TfL aim to thread CS1 through this area with a minimum of change to the recently completed work, which in spite of repeated reminders to the design team, took no account of the planned CS1.  This simply will not work.  There have been numerous complaints on the dangers of the present layout, for example going straight ahead from West Green Rd to Broad Lane, across other traffic flows.  If CS1 is “bolted on” to this already unsatisfactory situation, a need for many more dangerous manoeuvres will be added.  For example how will cycles access CS1 from Broad Lane?  Are they meant to filter through waiting pedestrians at the unsegregated Toucan Crossings?  This might be acceptable for a low volume cycle route, but for a superhighway and the high pedestrian traffic in this location, it isn’t.
We can find no precedent for the “stepping stone” shared use markings proposed by TfL and think they will cause confusion.  There are precedents for clearly marked cycle paths in pedestrian areas, for example in Seville where studs are used in conjunction with pedestrian priority signs (where appropriate).  The photograph below shows a cycle route at a tramline crossing (see also
http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/jan/28/seville-cycling-capital-southern-europe-bike-lanesfor a general review of cycle provision in Seville).  There is also guidance on cycle route shared use marking and junction design in the new London Cycle Design Standards.  TfL are presently building or upgrading a number of Cycle Superhighways following these Standards and it would be a real missed opportunity if the only Superhighway planned for Haringey is not compliant.  I would be grateful if you could take this up with TfL.
Regards,   Michael Poteliakhoff
Coordinator, Haringey Cycling Campaign
__________

 

The consultation on Cycle Superhighway 1 was due to launch in late 2014, but consultation is now due in February 2015, and CS1 is due for completion in April 2016.

barclays-cycle-superhighways-map1

TfL’s current proposals can be seen in TfL Board papers at https://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/documents/board-20150204-part-1-item-07a-propose-csh-scheme.pdf  (pages 50-55).

London Cycling Campaign and Haringey Cycling Campaign have objected to the proposed alignment in Haringey, in particular the narrow and very busy section along St Ann’s Rd, but we are now concentrating on whatever alignment goes ahead being built to the best possible standard.

It looks as if it’s going to be more of a “Superquietway” than a proper CS.  Our full consultation response comments will be made when the details go public – make sure you give TfL your feedback!

 

news

Suggest a Bikehangar location in Haringey

We’re receiving a lot of requests via Twitter and email, asking how to request secure cycle parking in your road, so thought we better create a ‘How to’ guide!

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Grand opening of the Warwick Gardens Bikehangar – the first in Haringey. There was a waiting list for spaces within a week.

What is a ‘bikehangar’?

Good question. They’re actually called ‘The Lambeth Bikehangar’ but don’t let that put you off – they can live in Haringey too, and some already do!

More info via Cyclehoop, who supply and install the units:  Bikehangar is an award-winning popular design for outdoor sites offering a safe and effective way to protect bikes from tough weather conditions and vandalism where storage space is limited. The gas assisted door makes accessing your bike simple, reducing effort when opening the hangar. Furthermore, the galvanized steel frame acts to protect your bike from the elements as well as theft.

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It is an effective street de-cluttering design which can store up to six bicycles and only occupies half a parking space. The Lambeth Bikehangar is very popular with councils, who can purchase it and rent out cycle parking spaces to local residents. If you are a resident interested in renting a space in a Lambeth Bikehangar, please search for the one closest to you or request one to be installed on your road here.

Find out more on the Cyclehoop website. 

Where are they in Haringey?

As of April 2018, there are now 54 Bikehangars installed in the borough of Haringey. Full details of locations can be found on Cyclehoop’s website.

How do I request one for where I live?

The more requests for a Bikehangar in a specific location, the more likely it will happen, so knock on your neighbours’ doors and get them involved! Full details are available on Haringey Council’s website, which has some helpful tips to make sure your application has the best chance of success, but do also make sure you do the following:

  1. Send an email to cycle.parking@haringey.gov.uk Copy us in: haringey@lcc.org.uk  AND your local ward councillors for Haringey. Click here to find out their email addresses
  2. You might want to check if your local councillors supports Space for Cycling in their ward first
  3. You could also suggest a location, by filling in the form on the Cyclehoop website. Cyclehoop will give a report to Haringey Council and a map of the requested locations.

Bikehangars in the wild….

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Here’s a fine example of a modal filter and Bikehangar just over the border in Hackney on Finsbury Park Road.

Want to request a location for a sheffield stand? Email cycle.parking@haringey.gov.uk (expect an autoreply). Try to include a photo or Streetview link of where you would like the stand, and state why you think one (or more) should be installed. 

Want more advice? Tweet @haringeycyclist or email Haringey@lcc.org.uk

 

news

Council’s 3 year plan – HAVE YOUR SAY

Screenshot 2014-12-31 at 09.46.53

LB Haringey is facing a 25% cut in funding and has issued a Corporate Plan.  There is a consultation running to 18 January 2015.

Haringey Council have included a photograph of someone on a bike on the front cover of their Draft Corporate Plan 2015-2018

We have added some additional notes in red below  – but please spare a few minutes to complete this survey –  tell Haringey Council what you think.

The financial strategy proposals include cost saving (or increased revenue) from (our list, not complete!):-
  • Adult social services cost cutting
  • Changes to services for Young People including Young Offenders
  • Reduced street cleaning
  • Remove all street recycling collection points
  • Close Park View Road Reuse and Recycling Centre (there would only be the Western Road RRC)
  • New way of delivering Highways and Street Lighting Services (less reactive maintenance)
  • Increased enforcement of moving traffic offences
  • Reductions in back office technical and administrative support
  • Planning – Changes to Policy and Practice remove non-statutory consultation
  • Reduce Work on Carbon Reduction by withdrawing support for Community Projects and Initiatives
There is also a new Corporate Plan, restating Haringey’s objectives which will continue to be implemented,
within the new budget limitations.

We propose making comments on the cost cutting and suggestions for amending the Corporate Plan as below – you may wish to use these comments in your own response

 

Reduced street cleaning-  It is vitally important that the clearing of broken glass and debris from cycle lanes
(and cycle routes generally) is not reduced, as punctures are a major disincentive to cycle use, particularly
among children and adults returning to cycling.
Less reactive maintenance to street lighting-  This should be achieved by using more reliable lighting (eg LED), not
by removing illumination from signs, which is essential for road safety.
Increased enforcement of moving traffic offences-  This is welcome and should include 20mph and ASL enforcement
Reductions in back office technical and administrative support-  Please confirm this will not lead to a reduction in
road planning and engineering staff, as this would inhibit implementation of Corporate Plan Priority 3
Planning – Changes to Policy and Practice remove non-statutory consultation-  Please confirm this will not reduce
consultation with environmental action groups such as ourselves and Living Streets

Haringey Corporate Plan 2015 – 18, Haringey Cycling Campaign’s suggested amendments  are shown in red

Priority 3:
Clean, Green and Safe
A clean and safe borough where people are proud to live
We will make Haringey one of the most cycling and pedestrian friendly boroughs in London.
We will promote and improve cycling and walking, which will include introducing a borough
wide 20mph limit, increasing the network of cycle routes and dedicated cycle lanes and providing a
smarter travel campaign to persuade people to use sustainable modes of transport.
PRIORITY 3 – A CLEAN AND SAFE BOROUGH WHERE
PEOPLE ARE PROUD TO LIVE
Who will be involved in delivering the objective?
1. The council will work with existing community networks such as Neighbourhood Watch,
Friends of Parks, traders and residents associations to increase their numbers and support
them to take action themselves
2. We will help develop groups such as Environmental, Winter and Cycle Champions and introduce a
network of Young Environmental Champions
Objectives How will we deliver the objective?
Who will be involved in delivering the objective? To move to more sustainable modes of
transport by making Haringey one of the most cycling and pedestrian friendly boroughs in London
1. We will promote and improving cycling and walking in the borough. This will include introducing
a borough-wide 20mph limit, providing more cycle racks, increasing the network of cycle routes and
dedicated cycle lanes, providing more cycle training, improved signage, and safety measures on
priority pedestrian crossings, and launching a smarter travel campaign to change behaviours and
get more people to use sustainable modes of transport.  All road schemes will be assessed for
pedestrian and cycle safety
The council will work with:
1. Cyclists, pedestrians and community groups to further understand their needs and design
solutions together
2. TfL to implement design best practice and to identify funding streams
3. Our highways contractor to implement schemes and maintain quality control
4. Schools to promote the health benefits of cycling and walking
How will we know that we have been successful?
1. More people will be cycling, walking and or
using public transport
2. There will be an improved network of cycle
routes
3. Improved satisfaction with our footways
4. Cycling and walking will be safer
How will we measure success from 2015-2018?
1. Increased network Km coverage for cycling
2. Increase in the number of people who cycle or
walk
Draft cross-cutting themes
A fair and equal borough (Objectives and delivery similar to environmental objectives)
How will we measure success from 2015-2018?
2. Increase in children travelling to school by walking or cycling and an
increase in cycle training in schools
3. A halt in the rise in childhood obesity, especially in those groups with higher rates
consultations, news

Our response to TfL’s Archway consultation

Thank you to all London Cycling Campaign members and supporters in Haringey and Islington who spared a minute to respond to Transport for London’s proposals for the removal of the Archway Gyratory system.
Click here  to review Islington Cyclists Action Group’s full response on their website.
20141204-Archway-Redesigned-1038x576
As well as many individual responses, Haringey Cycling Campaign responded to the proposals too. Here’s what we said:
Haringey Cycling Campaign welcomes the proposals, however the cycle routes through the junction are incomplete, with dangerous manoeuvres through general traffic still needed.  Continuous segregated cycle tracks and protected junctions are needed throughout.   We fully support the detailed comments of Islington Cyclists Action Group which can be summarised as-
1) Coming from Junction Road to St Johns Way there is a left hook risk: requiring cyclists to turn right across left turning traffic. A cycle track along the central Archway island and a cycle crossing on ArchwayRoad would ensure these cyclists are safe.
2) It is not clear how to get from Archway station into Holloway Road. We need a segregated track, clearly distinguishing bikes and pedestrians, linking the track down Highgate Hill in front of the station to the southbound Holloway Road track.
3) It is impossible to cross Archway Road north of Tollhouse Way. We need a link from Archway Road (northbound) to Archway Road/Harberton Road, particularly at Despard Road and Waterlow Road.
4) Macdonald Road and Vorley Road should be two way for cycling
Incomplete cycle provision can give a false sense of security and lead to increased risk, as at the Cycle Superhighway junctions now being upgraded and we trust these points can be addressed.
The scheme should avoid using guardrailing (none is shown), but there should be features such as kerbs, planting, bollards or seating to indicate the extent of pedestrian areas. The cycle lanes should have 45deg angle kerbs. Cycle parking can also be used to emphasise the edge of a pedestrian area, as used very successfully at Kingsland High St.